Page 1 of 1

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 7th, 2003, 9:21 am
by punkrocker483
ok first why are the used sleds that are only a year old so cheap they cost like 8 grand and they inly sell for about 4500 also does anyone know if there are ne dealers in upstate new york that has a left over 2003 ac sno pro thanks much appreciated

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 7th, 2003, 9:31 am
by yak165
Because through the race programs (except ski-doo) they don't cost $7500. Plus if the racer wants to afford a new sled for the next year they can't ask top dollar for it and sit on them forever to sell. Also, there is the bad reputation a sled that has been raced gets, some people think there is no life left in them after they've been raced a year.

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 7th, 2003, 10:31 am
by kawicat
if you are just starting out find a 98 or 99 sno-pro and use that for you first year. it will be about 1800 bucks and their won't be much difference since you don't have much racing experience.

why do you need a brand new sled to race anyway???

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 7th, 2003, 3:49 pm
by 8roy7
Here is another reason for you to be more interested in a used,2-3 year old race sled. The sled will have been taken care of fairly well.Cosmetically,it may not look that great,but that is not a major concern.Most of us have had the first season crashes and realize that they won't look like new for long anyway. You are going to be more concerned as a racer with taking care of the mechanical aspect. Experienced machines are generally very well maintained.It would be a serious mistake on a racer's part to fail to go through the machine(s) with a fine tooth comb after every event and repair/replace anything that looks or feels at all wrong.This is the part of my last reply to you that I spoke about the cost of keeping spares of everything that could possibly wear out or break.
One more plus to buying an experienced race sled. The current owner can and should be an invaluable source of information to you as nobody knows that sled better than them.
One last thing,if you are going to do this you really need to realize the physical conditioning necessary to race snocross. Your body takes a beating and the races never seem as short as they are. All I'm saying is you need to be in really great shape physically and have presence of mind to see past the sled in front of you to see potential problems before you are part of them.Don't take that wrong,I'm not talking down on anyone as I am in no way in that shape anymore and do not have the patience or health left to try to regain it. I'm just warning that it does take incredible strength and endurance to horse those sleds around when it's 0 degrees out and you just want to stay in the warm trailer. Good luck,it sounds like you're coming around finally. There will be plenty of machines available soon.

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 12th, 2003, 4:36 am
by skidoorider
Hey 8roy7.....
Should we got started on that physical conditioning program before or after the next Bud Lite !!!!????!!! RB

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 12th, 2003, 4:49 am
by yak165
In response to Kawcat's post, I would try to find at least an '00 snopro. There's a big difference between that style and the '98-'99, even for a begginer

am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 12th, 2003, 9:15 am
by cementhead
If you get into the sno pro's be careful with the cross link, I know a lot of people had trouble with them in the past, and some of the new ones are still hard to fine tune.





am listening now and have a few questions

PostPosted: February 12th, 2003, 11:38 am
by Polaris Sno-cross
Look around people who have early season injuries sometimes sell them real cheap to get them out of the way.