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Wannabe Rookie

Want to discuss racing? Race setups? Which kind of racing is best? This is the race place!

Wannabe Rookie

Postby ICE » December 14th, 2001, 10:16 pm

I know that I will catch some flack for this but... can anyone give me some tips on how to get into racing? Who is a good contact, dealers? Factories? Any help would be appreciated!
ICE
 
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Joined: December 14th, 2001, 9:31 pm
Location: TC, Mi

Wannabe Rookie

Postby X FAN » December 15th, 2001, 8:00 am

Ok try this site http://www.snowcross.com/info2001.html#start racing

this should help you out. hey you live in MI? i live in MI to at Roger city Alpena area on US 23 SOUTH not in the u.p. but i am at top of lower MI. CYA ON THE TRAIL'S .
OU MU+ E
A+
1UZ OU WERE I1
WH I PAED OU

X FAN
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Postby Jekyll » December 16th, 2001, 12:44 am


ICE,
First thing I would suggest is figure what you budjet is. This has a huge effect on what type of racing you can do (travel and meals will probabily cost the most). If you cant travel, this will limit you to the type of racing that is done in you area. Drags are usually the least expensive, Sno X is kind of hard on equipment and the body. Amature ovals are kind of hard to come -by and usually the amatures are pretty good.

When you figure what you are going to race, go to a few of the races and talk to the guys, most are pretty helpful. As at you local dealers if anyone they know is doing that type of racing. Usually they will let you tag along with them providing you are willing to help.

Buying ready to run used equipment is usually a great way to get started. You can learn as you go while you figure exactly where you fit in, in the future. You also gain knowlege for when you build you first sled.

Usually you local dealers will help you on pricing if they know you are racing, don't be afraid to ask for some help, just don't be pushy with them. LOL

Have fun and Enjoy every minute!!!
Jekyll
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Joined: October 14th, 2001, 9:26 am
Location: Coloma, MI


Wannabe Rookie

Postby Flatout » December 17th, 2001, 2:32 am

Good advice Mr Jekyll!
Racing is a sport that is expensive for every type of motor sport but it can be very enjoyable and can give you memories and confidence throughout the rest of your life. Racing can be dangerous and I guarantee you that you will flip at least once during your career! All types of snowmobile racing have classes for the beginner or "rookie". Oval racing has a low dollar class called "Trail stock" that prevents the more experienced racers from cleaning up in the class and keeps the cost and prep to a minimum by restricting the traction and modifications to a bare minimum. A couple of hundred dollars in good carbides and some studs are all you need! The best way to get involved is for two buddies to prep the sleds together and go test together on a lake. Make sure that your sled is bone stock and your tether switch works. You will need a safe-jac
to race with and a snell 95 helmet. This type of racing is a blast since it is all beginners and stockers. You will wn a few and lose a few but you will become falmiliar with setup and clutching and jetting. All things you are already doing if you are a performance enthusiast which you probably are if you want to race. The winner of the trail stock class for the season will be asked to graduate to the higher level for the following season to give other rookies a better chance to win. The SCM will run a class with a minimum of 3 sleds so get your buds interested and lets go racing!
Flatout
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Postby maxiracer » December 17th, 2001, 2:49 am

Hey ICE, Jeckel nailed it pretty well, figure out what you can afford to lose racing, then check out the local circuits, Here in MI you can run slo cross in ASRA, and the Michigan sno cross series, you can run ovals in MIRA, they have plenty of classes for new racers. Also you can oval race older equipment with a better chance of success than trying to race with a older sled in snocross. As for drags, Wellston has a good series going, and Kalkaska has a very nice strip if you want to race there. Drags are fun and easier to set up a sled than ovals or sno cross. Check out a local race, and find some officials and ask questions. Make sure you spend money on good safety equipment, buy the best you can afford, I have a helmet from a race in '96 where I got my head ran over in a oval race, 200+ dollars down the toilet, but I could race the next week, only got a concussion and some minor whiplash, with a cheap lid, who knows what would have happened!! Good luck and have FUN, that's the most important part of racing.
[b]Bevra Vintage Ice Oval Racing. Old School rules...[/b]
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Postby 3739 » December 19th, 2001, 1:01 pm

Ice.

You've got alot of sound advice. If you can fine a sled Pro Sprint is a fairly cheap class to start ovals. Even the fan 440 class is good depending where you are from.

Just a warning . When you start racing its hard to stop. The faster you go the the more it costs.
Go hard - turn left. OVALS ARE THE ANSWER
3739
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Wannabe Rookie

Postby 3739 » December 19th, 2001, 1:01 pm

Ice.

You've got alot of sound advice. If you can fine a sled Pro Sprint is a fairly cheap class to start ovals. Even the fan 440 class is good depending where you are from.

Just a warning . When you start racing its hard to stop. The faster you go the the more it costs.
Go hard - turn left. OVALS ARE THE ANSWER
3739
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Posts: 26
Joined: November 10th, 2001, 4:41 pm


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