Subscribe Today

Snow-dust

Snow-dust

Postby Petawawarace » December 17th, 2011, 10:40 am

Thats not a bad idea if it could be done cheap enough. You would need a by-pass though if someone broke down and was able to get off of the track in a safe manner, or pull to the infield.

Lots of great ideas guys!!!!
DeJongMotorsports.com
Petawawarace
Member
 
Posts: 118
Joined: April 25th, 2005, 5:44 pm
Location: Petawawa ON

Snow-dust

Postby PDRacing » December 17th, 2011, 11:10 am

hey Jeff,

Reset is a good point, Track officials could hit a reset or driver resets tether.

I did some looking and there are units out here, they about $300 each for the transmitters with a tether, but you still have to build lights etc.

Much like Eagle charges for transponders, the association could charge $25 a day per sled to help pay for them, or mandate them as a safety device and each sled has to have one in the faster classes.

Maybe find a wireless Telecommunications Sponsor for them, and promote "High Speed Safety with Wireless!" brought to you by ???????.:E
Richard Scroggs #13 EPT
PDRacing
Member
 
Posts: 13
Joined: March 16th, 2004, 10:42 am
Location: Sarnia, Ontario

Snow-dust

Postby brouse » December 17th, 2011, 12:23 pm

Gentlemen most bad accidents happen in about 1.5seconds. Experienced corner workers and main flagman can have red flags up in 3seconds.If you can come up with a system that can shut down a race in 1 second i am all ears.
brouse
Member
 
Posts: 10
Joined: January 6th, 2011, 3:37 am
Location: beausejourmanitoba canada


Snow-dust

Postby Petawawarace » December 17th, 2011, 12:49 pm

It is a good idea, but it doesn't solve the major issue once again. If you could see what was going on, you could avoid it and react faster than any warning decive could ever
DeJongMotorsports.com
Petawawarace
Member
 
Posts: 118
Joined: April 25th, 2005, 5:44 pm
Location: Petawawa ON

Snow-dust

Postby Ovals Forever » December 17th, 2011, 2:02 pm

You guys are right,
It's all about the snow fog, the more I think about it the more I am convinced that if there were some place high up at each track where 1 person from each team could stand and be able to talk to his driver it would be the best idea yet for safty.

They do it in Nascar why can't it be done here, if a team wanted to try this is there anything in the rules that says they can't?
Ovals Forever
Member
 
Posts: 346
Joined: March 21st, 2005, 7:20 pm
Location: Lisbon ND

Snow-dust

Postby snowman39 » December 17th, 2011, 2:21 pm

I will start with the Comment " Please don't shoot the Messenger"

Snow dust is a huge problem of which we all agree, I have some thoughts, first of all My love has and always be Snowmobile racing,

Many years ago i ran a stock car track, a great experiance of which i will draw my thoughts from.

# 1 all tracks should have brooms, Rent them , borrow them, this will be one thing that will help, Not eliminate, But help

# 2 Prior to Major finals, set up a truck, say a 1 ton, with a 150 or so gallon tank and some real fine mister nozzels, not enough to flood, just enough to re seal the track.

# 3 Get electronis lights, red and yellow and place before each corner, Have a master control site, up High, Eagle River high on Front Straight away, Beausejour, Press booth on Back Stretch

# 4 Raceceivers with ONE person talking, RED, YELLOW, CRASH. a mature well seasoned person, All tracks have them, or Hire one and have him at all races.

# 5 better lights on Sleds and on Driver helmets

In closing, Snowmobile racing is an awesome sport,Its sad when there is accidents, None of us want to see that, Impliment these 5 items, I am sure they will HELP,never 100% eliminate BUT Help

One Mans Opinion

Guy
[b]Guy Budel[/b]
snowman39
Member
 
Posts: 44
Joined: January 16th, 2004, 5:02 pm
Location: Beausejour

Snow-dust

Postby Ovals Forever » December 17th, 2011, 3:57 pm

When you are going in excess of 100 mph and someone comes off there sled and crashes in front of you and all you here in your helmet is crash it does you no good if you can't see that the crash is right in your path and in a split second you are airborn from hitting the crashed sled or worse yet the driver.

Now if in the same scenario you here in your helmet, go down, or you could have codes like

"Man Down" - Meaning man on the track your best bet is to go down
"Man Up " - Meaning man on the track your best bet is to go up
"Sled Down" - Sled on the track go down
"Sled UP" - Sled on track go up.

These could be used when you only have a split second to warn your driver.

This might give a driver a fighting chance.

If it were me driving it would have to be someone I can trust and understand in my ear, and not say a word during the race unless there was trouble on the track, if there was a crash and it wasen't right in front of me he could tell me that also so I could slow down accordingly, not slow down to fast and cause another crash. How many times have you seen that happen?

Just another man's opinion
Darren
Ovals Forever
Member
 
Posts: 346
Joined: March 21st, 2005, 7:20 pm
Location: Lisbon ND

Snow-dust

Postby that 31 car » December 17th, 2011, 4:51 pm

Comments to Mr. Budel and Darren:
First of all thank you for some very well thought out input.
I feel one tower person, with experience would be a great help, but remember one cannot see the whole track in many cases. Many tracks need spotters front and back straight. Snowbanks, infield parking, special snowcross tracks infield, etc. all limit what can be seen. I know at the derby,the key races are controlled from front and back. Still even if it's two guys fine, I do not see a individual spotter for each sled however, I'll leave out some folks thoughts of blocking and unsportsman like stuff, and just concentrate on spotting in general. Every spotter is different, every driver different, some need cheerleaders, some want no talk at all, some drivers want the spotter watching cars 3-4 ahead of them and picking the fast line, some want the spotter to just clear them when passing, and some want constant position location. In the case of wrecks, spotters aren't gods,they can save the driver from some wrecks, and in some cases they are just clearing the mike when the driver drives into the pile. I've spotted for several years,Mid-Am's, Sportsman, Limited Late models and Late Models, Five different drivers, five different styles,five different needs. Can't be too bad at it as a new team asked me to help next year, but the point is this, no spotter is "on" on every call. Sight lines, angles, sunlight, shadow,and just plain old human error, all enter in.
Get a tower guy who stays cool, and shuts em all down, is my vote.
Regards
Korinek
that 31 car
Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: February 15th, 2002, 9:06 am
Location: Next to the big swamp. Menchalville, WI.

Snow-dust

Postby PDRacing » December 17th, 2011, 5:44 pm

[quote=that 31 car]
Get a tower guy who stays cool, and shuts em all down, is my vote.
Regards
Korinek[/quote]

That's kinda what I was saying but electronically with a tether, throw the red light or signal.

At Canada's Wonderland, on their gas powered go kart track, (not the fastest) if there is a crash there the system sends a signal and shuts down the ignition to all the Karts. I am not suggesting the ignition by any means, just saying Red Lights coming on around the track and signal to head sets.

I have had some close really calls with wreck sleds on the track, and it is hard to see flag guys at the last minute some times, so I truly appreciate this topic.
Richard Scroggs #13 EPT
PDRacing
Member
 
Posts: 13
Joined: March 16th, 2004, 10:42 am
Location: Sarnia, Ontario

Snow-dust

Postby EPT Race Director » December 18th, 2011, 2:13 am

Hi,
I know that lights and electronic stuff have many good points, but we don't have to give them the entire responsibility of our lives. What happens is the system shut down during a race? Cut wire, low batteries, fake alarm, frozen, broken. Unplugged... That means we still have to use flagman to signal on the track. The only way to do not need them is using a parfect light and transmitter system which is probably not affordable or ready for our specific conditions.

The only fast and cheap way is paying for good and experienced corner guys, flagman and spotters, that are present every race of the season. I understand the human error factor, but what about the electronic stuff? Should we rely entirely to an electronic system?

I think a good flagman can react enough fast to stop the race if there is a real problem. Now what we can do is using more flags on the track. What about a flagman on backstretch. Could we elevate evey corner guy in a tower? They should wear also an entire orange suit extremely visible. And about the emergency switch, what happens if the last racer is angry and call a crash to restart the race or just make the first ones slowing down?

The only way I see an electronic system is: activated by an official only. I know lights (red, green and yellow) are a good issue, but does anyone know a system ready for our winter conditions? Batteries are not ready for the temperature so we have to use wires. Wires are always fragile and are always at the wrong place. Anyone has experience in track lightening.

Too many details, not much money and not enough time I think.
Jordan
[b]Jordan Ouellet[/b], Eastern Pro Tour Race Director.
[url=www.eptracing.com]Official EPT Racing Website[/url]
EPT Race Director
 
Posts: 1
Joined: December 4th, 2011, 1:55 pm
Location: Montral

PreviousNext

Return to Ovals & Enduros

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron